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asylum-art:

Richard ClarksonInteractive Light shaped like a Cumulus Cloud

This wonderful interactive audiovisual fixture by Richard Clarkson’s inter-disciplinary design studio brings all of the thunder but none of the rain of a summer storm to your home’s interior. The “Cloud” thunder storm lamp and speaker system looks like a rain cloud on a leash that can even interact with people and sounds around it.

This smart little creative lamp is replete with lights, motion sensors, microphones, and a powerful speaker system. A remote control allows user to set it to different modes, getting it to act like a simple thunder cloud, to respond to movements in its surroundings, or to respond to sounds or music that it hears around it. The poofy outer layer definitely completes the illusion that we’re looking at a cloud.

(via lemon2jul)

astronomicalwonders:

The Cool Clouds of the Carina Nebula
"Observations made with the APEX telescope in submillimetre-wavelength light at a wavelength of 870 µm reveal the cold dusty clouds from which stars form in the Carina Nebula. This site of violent star formation, which plays host to some of the highest-mass stars in our galaxy, is an ideal arena in which to study the interactions between these young stars and their parent molecular clouds.
The APEX observations, made with its LABOCA camera, are shown here in orange tones, combined with a visible light image from the Curtis Schmidt telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. The result is a dramatic, wide-field picture that provides a spectacular view of Carina’s star formation sites. The nebula contains stars equivalent to over 25 000 Suns, and the total mass of gas and dust clouds is that of about 140 000 Suns.”
Credit: ESO/APEX/T. Preibisch et al. (Submillimetre); N. Smith, University of Minnesota/NOAO/AURA/NSF (Optical)

astronomicalwonders:

The Cool Clouds of the Carina Nebula

"Observations made with the APEX telescope in submillimetre-wavelength light at a wavelength of 870 µm reveal the cold dusty clouds from which stars form in the Carina Nebula. This site of violent star formation, which plays host to some of the highest-mass stars in our galaxy, is an ideal arena in which to study the interactions between these young stars and their parent molecular clouds.

The APEX observations, made with its LABOCA camera, are shown here in orange tones, combined with a visible light image from the Curtis Schmidt telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. The result is a dramatic, wide-field picture that provides a spectacular view of Carina’s star formation sites. The nebula contains stars equivalent to over 25 000 Suns, and the total mass of gas and dust clouds is that of about 140 000 Suns.”

Credit: ESO/APEX/T. Preibisch et al. (Submillimetre); N. Smith, University of Minnesota/NOAO/AURA/NSF (Optical)

astronomicalwonders:

Star Formation in the Monkey Head Nebula
This Hubble mosaic unveils a collection of carved knots of gas and dust in a small portion of the Monkey Head Nebula (also known as NGC 2174 and Sharpless Sh2-252). The Monkey Head Nebula is a roiling region of starbirth located 6,400 light-years away. The nebula is a star-forming region that hosts dusky dust clouds silhouetted against glowing gas.
Massive, newly formed stars near the center of the nebula (and toward the top in this image) are blasting away at dust within the nebula. Ultraviolet light from these bright stars helps carve the dust into giant pillars. The nebula is mostly composed of hydrogen gas, which becomes ionized by the ultraviolet radiation.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

Star Formation in the Monkey Head Nebula

This Hubble mosaic unveils a collection of carved knots of gas and dust in a small portion of the Monkey Head Nebula (also known as NGC 2174 and Sharpless Sh2-252). The Monkey Head Nebula is a roiling region of starbirth located 6,400 light-years away. The nebula is a star-forming region that hosts dusky dust clouds silhouetted against glowing gas.

Massive, newly formed stars near the center of the nebula (and toward the top in this image) are blasting away at dust within the nebula. Ultraviolet light from these bright stars helps carve the dust into giant pillars. The nebula is mostly composed of hydrogen gas, which becomes ionized by the ultraviolet radiation.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

(via megacosms)